Nine days in Colombia: part 3 — Bogota

by Sandra Hutchinson

For the last three days of our family’s trip to Colombia in January, 2019, we headed to Bogota, the capital. At approximately 8600 feet, Bogota is the third highest altitude capital city in the world.

The plaza in front of La Catedral Primada, Bolivar Square, Bogota, Colombia.

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Nine days in Colombia: part 2— Medellin

Mural in the neighborhood Comuna 13, in Medellin, Colombia, sums up what has happened in this city since the decades of violence and civil war have largely ended.

By Sandra Hutchinson

After our family had spent several days in Cartagena, on the northern coast of Colombia, we flew with Avianca, the national airline of Colombia, to Medellin. It was an easy, less-than-an hour flight.

Known as the “city of eternal spring” because of its year-round temperate climate, this city of about 2 1/2 million people was also formerly known as the “murder capital of the world,” as the home of notorious drug cartel leader Pablo Escobar. But with Escobar’s death, and a peace accord between the guerrillas and the democratically-elected president,  Medellin has evolved, and it’s now considered a relatively safe place to visit.

I’ll mention the highlights of our two days in Medellin. Continue reading

Nine days in Colombia: first stop — Cartagena

by Sandra Hutchinson

When our family told friends and acquaintances that we had decided to travel over the New Year’s holiday to Colombia, most looked at us in wide-eyed disbelief. “Why on earth would you go there?” was the most frequent reply. A few even asked us if we meant Columbia, South Carolina, not South America.

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We whiled away some time at this cafe in Getsemani, a Cartagena neighborhood outside the walled colonial city.

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Food tour in Bogota’s La Candelaria neighborhood

by Sandra Hutchinson

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A popular souvenir from Colombia is a miniature house that incorporates symbols of the country. Even though many parts of the country are now safe to visit, this little house still sports a tiny rifle!

During the first week of January, 2019, my family spent several days in Bogota, Colombia, as part of a nine-day adventure in Cartagena, Medellin and Bogota. One of my sons had made the travel arrangements for us, and he had booked us into a walking/food tour in Bogota’s La Candelaria.

Typical street scene in La Candelaria.

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Ireland – Part 2 – Cliffs of Moher, Dingle, Killarney National Park, Ring of Kerry

By Sandra Hutchinson

Slea Head Drive, Dingle Peninsula, County Kerry, Ireland

This is Part 2 of my blog post on our ten-day trip to Ireland in October, 2018. The first part covered Dublin, Belfast, the Antrim Coast (Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge, Giant’s Causeway and Bushmills Distillery), Ashford Castle in Cong, Connemara and Kylemore Abbey.

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Ten days in Ireland — Part 1: Dublin, Belfast, Antrim Coast, Connemara

by Sandra Hutchinson

Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge, on the Antrim Coast, Northern Ireland

My husband and I took a ten-day trip to Ireland in October, 2018, to celebrate our wedding anniversary. Our trip included one full day in Dublin and several days in Northern Ireland (which is part of the United Kingdom, not the Republic of Ireland), before heading southwest through several regions on the west coast, including Connemara, the Burren, the Cliffs of Moher, the Dingle Peninsula, and Killarney National Park, including portions of the Ring of Kerry.

This post is Part 1, covering the first six days or so of our trip. Part 2 will cover the rest of the trip, as well as my travel tips for Americans visiting Ireland.

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Bon Appétit! Julia Child’s kitchen at the National Museum of American History

by Sandra Hutchinson

In 2001, when the food historians at the National Museum of American History in Washington, D.C. learned that famous chef, TV personality and cookbook author Julia Child (1912-2004) was selling her home in Cambridge, Mass. and moving back to her home state of California, they contacted her to discuss the possibility of including some of her culinary objects in the museum’s collection. They were invited to visit Ms. Child in Cambridge, and she agreed to donate the entirety of her kitchen to the museum — literally every object that she had collected and used in her kitchen from the late 1940s, through 2001, including appliances, pots and pans, cookbooks on the shelf, even the magnets on the fridge.

The signage says the only things the museum added are the plastic tomatoes (in the trug) and bananas in the bowl on the table. Also, the museum recreated the linoleum floor from Ms. Child’s kitchen out of paper.

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