Nine days in Colombia: first stop — Cartagena

by Sandra Hutchinson

When our family told friends and acquaintances that we had decided to travel over the New Year’s holiday to Colombia, most looked at us in wide-eyed disbelief. “Why on earth would you go there?” was the most frequent reply. A few even asked us if we meant Columbia, South Carolina, not South America.

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We whiled away some time at this cafe in Getsemani, a Cartagena neighborhood outside the walled colonial city.

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Food tour in Bogota’s La Candelaria neighborhood

by Sandra Hutchinson

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A popular souvenir from Colombia is a miniature house that incorporates symbols of the country. Even though many parts of the country are now safe to visit, this little house still sports a tiny rifle!

During the first week of January, 2019, my family spent several days in Bogota, Colombia, as part of a nine-day adventure in Cartagena, Medellin and Bogota. One of my sons had made the travel arrangements for us, and he had booked us into a walking/food tour in Bogota’s La Candelaria.

Typical street scene in La Candelaria.

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Our Eli Terry, Jr. Pillar & Scroll clock

By Sandra Hutchinson

Early this spring, I attended an auction in Washington County, New York, with the intention of bidding on a Federal mahogany console table for my front hall. While at the preview, I noticed a shelf with several clocks that were to be included in the auction later that evening.

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Ireland – Part 2 – Cliffs of Moher, Dingle, Killarney National Park, Ring of Kerry

By Sandra Hutchinson

Slea Head Drive, Dingle Peninsula, County Kerry, Ireland

This is Part 2 of my blog post on our ten-day trip to Ireland in October, 2018. The first part covered Dublin, Belfast, the Antrim Coast (Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge, Giant’s Causeway and Bushmills Distillery), Ashford Castle in Cong, Connemara and Kylemore Abbey.

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Ten days in Ireland — Part 1: Dublin, Belfast, Antrim Coast, Connemara

by Sandra Hutchinson

Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge, on the Antrim Coast, Northern Ireland

My husband and I took a ten-day trip to Ireland in October, 2018, to celebrate our wedding anniversary. Our trip included one full day in Dublin and several days in Northern Ireland (which is part of the United Kingdom, not the Republic of Ireland), before heading southwest through several regions on the west coast, including Connemara, the Burren, the Cliffs of Moher, the Dingle Peninsula, and Killarney National Park, including portions of the Ring of Kerry.

This post is Part 1, covering the first six days or so of our trip. Part 2 will cover the rest of the trip, as well as my travel tips for Americans visiting Ireland.

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Bon Appétit! Julia Child’s kitchen at the National Museum of American History

by Sandra Hutchinson

In 2001, when the food historians at the National Museum of American History in Washington, D.C. learned that famous chef, TV personality and cookbook author Julia Child (1912-2004) was selling her home in Cambridge, Mass. and moving back to her home state of California, they contacted her to discuss the possibility of including some of her culinary objects in the museum’s collection. They were invited to visit Ms. Child in Cambridge, and she agreed to donate the entirety of her kitchen to the museum — literally every object that she had collected and used in her kitchen from the late 1940s, through 2001, including appliances, pots and pans, cookbooks on the shelf, even the magnets on the fridge.

The signage says the only things the museum added are the plastic tomatoes (in the trug) and bananas in the bowl on the table. Also, the museum recreated the linoleum floor from Ms. Child’s kitchen out of paper.

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Paradise Mill and Silk Museum, Macclesfield, England

by Sandra Hutchinson

The Silk Road may have begun in China, but many people say the western terminus was the city of Macclesfield, in Cheshire, in northwest England. Macclesfield is known for once being the world’s largest producer of finished silk products. In the 1830s, 71 silk mills operated in this market town.

Today, you can walk through Paradise Mill, a working museum where visitors can see original Jacquard looms demonstrated by museum staff. Next to Paradise Mill is the Silk Museum, which presents an extensive exhibit on the history of silk weaving and printing, including a display of a number of looms.

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